Lenticular Clouds

Ingleborough sunsetLate afternoon and I pull in at the viewpoint to photograph the cloudscape as we cross the moor top between Hawes and Langstrothdale.

Lenticular cloud
Lenticular cloud

“I think those clouds are caused by air rising as it moves over a hill,” I suggest to the man who has pulled in just behind us to photograph them on his iPad, “I’ve been reading The Cloudspotter’s Guide, but I can’t remember what they’re called.”

“Lenticular clouds?”

“That’s right; you are a cloud spotter?”

“No . . . just nutty!”

Just as I’ve got myself back in the car and out of the cool breeze, I notice another cloud-spotting feature to the left of the lenticular cloud that is hanging above Ingleborough and I grab my camera.

Sun Dog

Sun dog
One of these bright patches is not the real sun.
Sun dog
Sun dog

“Have you seen the sun-dog?” I ask the man with the iPad; “They’re caused by ice crystals in high clouds refracting the light and they always appear at a certain distance from the sun – I think it’s something like 23 degrees.”

“I wonder if that’s because we’re at 53 degrees north?” He surmises.

I wasn’t too far out, it’s 22° but the phenomenon is a halo effect caused by tiny ice crystals in translucent cloud, so the effect is independent of latitude.

Sunset over Langstrothdale

With 'sunset' setting.

Half an hour later I take the opportunity to photograph sunset over the top end of the dale from the first floor window of our barn conversion accommodation at Nethergill Farm.

sunset langstrothdale

It’s the first time that I’ve tried the ‘sunset’ setting on my camera. It might have warmed up the colours a little but it’s more successful than the camera’s default setting which attempts to adjust the exposure to make the scene resemble regular daylight.

Links

Nethergill Farm

Cloud Appreciation Society

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